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Item Name: Photograph
Title: Goldstream
Maker: Patrick Close
Year: 1985
Country: Canadian
Materials: silver gelatin print on photographic paper
Measurements: overall: 36 cm x 36 cm
ID Number: PC89.22
Legal Status: PERMANENT COLLECTION


Extended Label Info: This photograph is one of a series of forest landscapes made by Patrick Close in the British Columbia rainforest. The title, “Goldstream” refers to a provincial park on Vancouver Island. In his photographic practice, Close strove to make images that would document a time and place as detailed as possible. To do this, he used several methods to maximize a sharp focus and gather details. He chose a large-format photographic camera, which uses sheet film negatives at least 4 X 5 inches in size. On a forest hike, this size of camera can be hard to manage, as it is large and heavy and needs to be mounted on a tripod; the advantage is that the negative is closer to the finished print size, minimizing detail loss through enlarging. Close used a slow-speed fine-grained film negative, and then took the photo through a small lens opening, or aperture, using a long shutter speed. The finished photographic print is exquisitely detailed and sharply focused image that captures the essence of the dense, rich forest. Patrick Close (1950- ) was born in Hafford, Saskatchewan. Close became interested in photography at the age of ten, setting up his own darkroom in a closet. He studied at McGill University in Montreal from 1967 to 1968 and earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Saskatchewan in 1973. In addition to his work as an artist, Close enjoyed a long career as an arts administrator, working for the Saskatchewan Arts Board, Sask Museums Association, and from 1990 to 2012, CARFAC Saskatchewan. His photographs have been exhibited nationally, and are held in numerous collections, including the MacKenzie Art Gallery, Museum of Modern Art in Stockholm, Sweden; the National Gallery of Canada; and Stedelijk Museum Het Toreke in Belgium.