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Item Name: Drawing
Title: Triptych
Maker: John Noestheden
Year: 1995
Country: Canadian
Materials: graphit, pencil on paper
Measurements: Panel 1: 107 cm x 75.25 cm; Panel 2: 106 cm x 75.25 cm; Panel 3: 106 cm x 75.5 cm
ID Number: PC98.3
Legal Status: PERMANENT COLLECTION


Extended Label Info: In this group of three drawings, the artist John Noestheden has covered each page in carefully drawn parallel lines. He developed this method of drawing as a meditative exercise in which each line is drawn as he takes a breath and then exhales. Though he strives for precision, inevitable subtle variations occur from the texture of his paper, the weight of his pencil, and the limitations of his hands and arms. Following this work, he created Drafting Silence in 1996, “25,920 horizontal lines to represent the average number of breaths we take in 24 hours. Each line is 36 inches long [91.44cm]—the length of time it takes to draw one line equals one complete breath cycle.” Throughout his career, Noestheden has returned many times to the exploration of the grid and parallel lines. He describes his practice as recording “thinking space” and a method to map time. Recently, in writing on his process for a new series, the ‘sterrenstof’ or stardust paintings [2010 – 2013] which are made of black acrylic paint mixed with meteorite dust and painted thickly in parallel lines, Noestheden observes how, “the lines take on a life of their own…tilled fields, waves on water, a return to the earth…” John Noestheden (1945 - ) was born in Amsterdam, and moved to Canada in 1952. He received a BFA in 1973 from the University of Windsor and an MFA in 1975 from Tulane University, New Orleans. Noestheden moved to Regina in 1990 to teach sculpture and drawing at the University of Regina. In 2010, he moved to Hamilton, Ontario where he maintains a rigorous art practice. His work is exhibited internationally and is represented in Canadian and American art museums as well as public and private collections.

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