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Item Name: Sculpture
Title: Second Story #1
Maker: Sean Whalley
Year: 2000
Country: Canadian
Materials: recycled lumber, window
Measurements: overall: 290 cm x 90 cm x 90 cm
ID Number: PC2007.1
Legal Status: PERMANENT COLLECTION


Extended Label Info: This sculpture is made from lumber upcycled out of materials that were discarded by renovation projects in Regina. It gives a second life to the wood originally harvested from old growth forests for the construction boom in Regina during the early twentieth century. Using a method of shaping the recycled boards with a bandsaw, Sean Whalley creates new tree-inspired forms. This sculpture was one of several bio-morphic “tree-houses” that made up an immersive installation entitled, “Second Story” which exhibited at Dunlop Art Gallery in 2004. This work also has a bird-like form, which gives reminder to the creatures that make homes in the trees that are harvested for our homes. Sean Woodruff Whalley (1969- ) was born in St. Catharines, Ontario. This city is part of the "Golden Horseshoe” which is the most industrialized area of Canada and was once home to the largest broad leaf forest in the world. The problems of deforestation and environmental degradation are issues that form the basis of Whalley’s artwork philosophy. To create his sculptures, Whalley chooses environmentally responsible and sustainable resources, and often utilizes discarded and recycled materials. After earning his B.F.A. from York University (1993), Whalley learned the "old-world technologies" of blacksmithing and coopering. Moving to Saskatchewan in 1997, Whalley earned his M.F.A. from the University of Regina (2000). In addition to his work as assistant professor of sculpture in the Visual Arts Department at the University of Regina, Whalley is an active member of Saskatchewan’s cultural community, and has both restored and collaborated on public sculptures, such as the Confederation Park Fountain. His work has been exhibited in Western Canada and is held in public collections.