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Item Name: Print
Title: Night Walking
Maker: Richard Gorman
Year: 1961
Country: Canadian
Materials: monoprint
Measurements: in frame: 57.8 cm x 73.6 cm; work: 44.5 cm x 60 cm
ID Number: PC2017.22
Legal Status: PERMANENT COLLECTION


Extended Label Info: Richard Gorman came to prominence in Canada with his abstract expressionist work. This artwork, “Night Walking” is representative of Gorman's highly regarded monoprints from the 1960s. Subtle and textural, work from this series received a print-making award in 1962 at the Seventh International Black-and-White Exhibition in Lugano, Switzerland. In mono-printing, the artist creates an image on a non-absorbent surface, such as plexiglass, and then transfers the image to paper using a press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then using brushes or rags to remove ink, creating a subtractive image. Richard Gorman (1935–2010) Born in Ottawa, Richard Gorman moved to Toronto to study at Ontario College of Art with Jock MacDonald, a member of the abstract painting group, the Painter’s Eleven. Following his graduation in 1958, Gorman was immediately offered representation with Greenwich Gallery (later Isaacs Gallery) in Toronto. In 1965, Gorman moved to England for a five-year period and represented Canada at the Paris Biennial (1966). He experimented with aluminum sculptures, film, and printmaking. Returning to Canada in 1971, Gorman taught painting and drawing at the Ottawa School of Art, University of Ottawa. Retiring in 1989, Gorman moved to Toronto and concentrated on painting. Over his career, Gorman’s artwork evolved from brightly coloured oils in the late fifties to a black and white series painted in 1960-63, created with non-traditional implements such as a spatula, and later, a silkscreen squeegee. In his late artwork Gorman returned to landscape and painted with watercolour en plein air at Parry Sound on Georgian Bay, the Severn River, and the Caledon Hills in Ontario. In 1996, Gorman’s work received a major retrospective at Ottawa Art Gallery. His works are represented in major museum and corporate collections across Canada.